Thailand – Committed to not create a new death penalty offence – rape?

Thai  government stays cool and firm in the face of calls for the death penalty for rapists…

Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha, who also heads the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO), was cool on the emotional response to the crime, noting that there was a global trend for capital punishment to be scrapped. “Let’s look at the world around us. Many countries have already abolished the death penalty,” he said, in response to the call.

Justice Ministry deputy permanent secretary Tawatchai Thaikyo expressed similar sentiments via Facebook, cautioning against any move to push for the death penalty for all rapists.

“We have to think as to whether the push will encourage rapists to kill all victims,” he said.

Of relevance also, is ADPAN’s statement concerning  sex offence and death penalty in Indonesia

ADPAN believes that punishment need to be meted out to the guilty, but definitely not the death penalty.

Several studies have also warned against focusing solely on punitive action as the solution to sex offences, rather proposing parent-focused child sex abuse prevention (Mendelson & Letourneau. 2015), involving men and boys as allies against sexual violence (Walsh. 2015), mechanisms to identify persons who are attracted to pre-pubescent girls (Beier et al. 2016) and introducing school-based sexuality education at an early age, containing modules addressing inappropriate touching and rape culture. (Coleman et al. 2015) The death penalty will not prevent rapes.

If deterrence is Indonesia’s objective for the introduction of the death penalty, it must be pointed out that there is no credible evidence to suggest that the death penalty is a deterrent. The Death Penalty Information Center points to higher murder rates in states that have the death penalty as proof the sentencing threat does not deter crime.

There is also concern that when death penalty is imposed for crimes that do not usually result in death of victims, as would apply to sex offences, there is a real risk that the death penalty would encourage the offender to murder the victim to destroy the evidence against him/her.

Therefore, ADPAN urges Indonesia to reconsider and abolish the death penalty for sex offenders. – ADPAN urges Indonesia to Abolish Death Penalty and Castration for Sex Offenders, 16/6/2016

Calls for death for rapists after brutal Saraburi murder

PUBLIC CALLS for the death penalty against rapists are growing in the wake of the shocking murder of a young female teacher, who died at the hands of a former convict.

Chatri Ruamsoongnern, a 27-year-old cement factory worker, has confessed to slitting the throat of a 26-year-old teacher to steal her valuables in Saraburi province. He has denied attempting to rape her but evidence at the scene reportedly suggested otherwise.

Tests are ongoing to determine whether the teacher was sexually violated.

Chatri emerged as the prime suspect from the beginning of police inquiries because he and the victim were neighbours, and he had previously been convicted of raping the wife of a friend. He completed a jail term of one year and seven months last August.

“We are waiting for the results from forensic tests to get solid evidence related to this case,” Provincial Police Region 1 commissioner Pol Lt-General Chaiwat Getvorachai said yesterday.

At present, Chatri is charged only with premeditated murder.

The teacher had rented a room inside a fenced estate where 10 rooms are available and many tenants are colleagues teaching at the same school. Chatri moved in about six months ago as the live-in boyfriend of a transgender woman.

The grieving family of the victim yesterday demanded that harshest penalty be meted out against the culprit. “Don’t give him any chance to harm others again. Please enforce the laws harshly,” the mother said.

Her husband also felt the same way. “I don’t intend to see laws kill a person. But if we let such a bad guy go free, he will kill again,” the victim’s father said.

Many social-media users joined their call, saying all rapists should be punished with death.

The sentiment echoed opinions expressed by many two years ago when a State Rail worker admitted to raping and killing a 13-year-old girl during an overnight ride with her family.

Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha, who also heads the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO), was cool on the emotional response to the crime, noting that there was a global trend for capital punishment to be scrapped. “Let’s look at the world around us. Many countries have already abolished the death penalty,” he said, in response to the call.

Justice Ministry deputy permanent secretary Tawatchai Thaikyo expressed similar sentiments via Facebook, cautioning against any move to push for the death penalty for all rapists.

“We have to think as to whether the push will encourage rapists to kill all victims,” he said.

He also said some parents lodged complaints against boys who had been in love and had sex with their underage daughters. “Would it be better if we require all convicted rapists to undergo a rehabilitation programme and give them support to prevent them from committing such crimes again?” he said.

Kobkiat Kasivivat, another deputy permanent secretary for the Justice Ministry, said separately that due to a shortage of psychologists and social workers, such rehabilitation programmes are now only available in Bangkok. He said if Chatri is convicted of any criminal offence he will not be eligible for a royal pardon because he committed the crime within five years of his previous jail sentence.

At present, 3,406 men and 985 women are serving jail terms under final court rulings for sex offences.

Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection’s head Wisit Wisitsora-at said facilities under his agency had individual counsellors in place. “Only 2 per cent of the high-risk group have become repeated offenders,” he said.-http://www.nationmultimedia.com/national/Calls-for-death-for-rapists-after-brutal-Saraburi–30289810.html

 

 

rape punish

Online push for death for rapists

SEVERAL online campaigns have been launched to press for rapists to get the death penalty.

Under Thai law, people convicted of rape can only be punished with a jail term, but often these offenders commit the crime again after serving their term.

Chatri Ruamsoongnern, the prime suspect in the recent brutal murder of a 26-year-old teacher in Saraburi, had previously been convicted of raping the wife of a friend a few years ago. He has allegedly confessed to killing the teacher – but claimed he did not try to rape her – after she fought him off last week.

“We believe rapists should be sentenced to death because even if their victims survive, they become the living dead,” the founder of a Facebook page pushing for death for rapists in Thailand said.

It was difficult for rape victims to return to a normal life emotionally, he said, no matter what counselling they have undergone. He also cited the fact that Chatri had walked out of jail just 10 months ago and had just confessed to killing the young teacher.

“Why should we let such convicts repeat their crimes? How many more victims will have to suffer such a fate?” he asked.

Thailand has not executed convicts for about seven years. The last executions were carried out in 2009 against convicted drug traffickers.

The country will be seen as having scrapped capital punishment in practice if it does not execute any convict for a decade.

At present, the great bulk of countries – about 140 – no longer implement the death penalty, either by law or in practice. Just 22 nations continue to end the lives of serious criminal offenders.

But by population size, more than 60 per cent of people in the world live in the countries where capital punishment is still carried out. Countries with large populations such as China, India, the United States and Indonesia, all endorse the death penalty.

Supporters of the capital punishment believe the death penalty is a deterrent and a sure way to prevent criminals from committing crimes again.

Opponents, however, argue that capital punishment is not a deterrent and express concern about the risk of innocent people being executed before vital details can emerge to clear people who face incriminating evidence.

On Monday night, police escorted Chatri to the teacher’s rented flat in Kaeng Khoi district in Saraburi to re-enact the crime after being forced to cancel a session earlier in the day due to the presence of angry people.

Chatri is currently under court-approved detention.

Meanwhile, police in Bang Na in Bangkok yesterday applied for an arrest warrant for Ekapon saw Teaw, 31, for allegedly raping a student in a public toilet late last month.

Records show that Ekapon already faces legal action for alleged possession of drugs and in 2013 he was accused of peeping at a woman on a toilet at a petrol station in Samut Prakan province. –Nation, 6/7/2016

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