Japan – If death penalty replaced with life imprisonment without parole, 52% for retaining death penalty.

In a recent opinion poll by the Cabinet Office in November 2019 on the death penalty, 9.0% of Japanese respondents answered it should be abolished in all cases, while 80.8% said that it was necessary in some cases
When asked if the death penalty should be kept or abolished in the case that a system of life sentencing without parole was introduced, 35.1% answered that it should be abolished, while 52.0% said it should continue.

Japan Data

Poll Reveals More than 80% Support Death Penalty in Japan

Society

A poll conducted by the Cabinet Office in November 2019 found that 80.8% of Japanese people feel that the death penalty is sometimes necessary.

 

In a recent opinion poll on the death penalty, 9.0% of Japanese respondents answered it should be abolished in all cases, while 80.8% said that it was necessary in some cases.

The opinion poll was conducted by the Cabinet Office in November 2019, targeted at 3,000 Japanese adults. The poll is held every five years and in the four polls since 2004, support for the death penalty has continuously topped 80%.

Among those who want to see the death penalty abolished (multiple answers possible), the most common, with 50.7%, was that if there is a mistake in the judgment, it cannot be undone.

On the other hand, the most common reason given by those who said that the death penalty was necessary was that the victim’s feelings had to be considered (56.6%).

When asked if the death penalty should be kept or abolished in the case that a system of life sentencing without parole was introduced, 35.1% answered that it should be abolished, while 52.0% said it should continue.

According to the Amnesty International Global Report: Death Sentences and Executions 2018, executions were carried out in 20 countries in 2018, of which the only Group of Seven nations were Japan and the United States. That same year, 15 people were executed in Japan, 13 of whom were Aum Shinrikyō cult leaders who had been involved in the deadly Tokyo subway sarin gas attack in 1995.

(Translated from Japanese. Banner photo © Pixta.)

Source: – Nippon.com , 4/2/2020

Japan hangs Chinese man in rare execution of foreigner

Japan hangs Chinese man in rare execution of foreigner

  • 26 December 2019
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Justice Minister Masako Mori: “It is an extremely cruel and brutal case”

Japan has hanged a Chinese man for the high-profile and brutal murder of a family of four, the first execution of a foreigner in 10 years.

The man, Wei Wei, carried out the murders in 2003 with two accomplices.

They fled to China, where one was executed in 2005 and the other sentenced to life in jail.

Japan has more than 100 prisoners on death row. Fifteen were executed last year, including 13 members of the Aum Shinrikyo doomsday cult.

Japan only started to disclose the names of executed inmates in 2007. Between then and the latest execution only one foreigner had been named – a Chinese man hanged in 2009.

Strangled or drowned

Justice Minister Masako Mori said she had signed off on the execution of Wei Wei “after careful consideration”.

“It is an extremely cruel and brutal case in which the happily living family members, including an eight-year-old and 11-year-old, were all murdered because of truly selfish reasons,” she said.

In Japan, death row inmates are not told of their impending execution until the day it is carried out.

Wei Wei, a former language student aged 40, had admitted carrying out the murders but denied playing the leading role.

He and his accomplices had tried to rob the home of businessman Shinjiro Matsumoto in the city of Fukuoka.

Mr Matsumoto was strangled, his two children strangled or smothered and his wife drowned in the bath.

Their bodies were weighed down and dumped in Hakata Bay, the Asahi Shimbun reported.

The Chinese man hanged in 2009 had killed three Chinese people he lived with in Tokyo.

The increase in executions in 2018 was the consequence of a Sarin nerve agent attack on the Tokyo underground system in 1995 by Aum Shinrikyo, an obscure religious group that believed the end of the world was coming.

Thirteen people died and at least 5,800 were injured in the attack. – BBC, 26/12/2019

Japan: Two hanged in ‘deplorable’ executions

Japan: Two hanged in ‘deplorable’ executions

Amnesty International has again called on Japan to abolish the death penalty after two men were executed in the country this morning.

In the early hours of Friday morning, Koichi Shoji, 64, was hanged at Tokyo Detention Centre, while Yasunori Suzuki, 50, was hanged at Fukuoka Detention Centre. Both had been convicted of murder.

The executions are the first in Japan in 2019, and bring the total number of executions under Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s administration to 38. Currently, 110 individuals remain on death row in Japan.

Roseann Rife, East Asia Research Director at Amnesty International, said:

“These executions demonstrate the Japanese government’s shocking disregard for human life. While the rest of the world increasingly turns its back on the death penalty, Japan remains stuck in the past by continuing with this ultimate cruel and irreversible punishment.

“It is deplorable that the government continues to carry out executions. As Japan prepares to host the UN Crime Congress next April, it is high time that its criminal justice system is reviewed to fully comply with international human rights law and standards.

“We urge the Japanese authorities to establish an immediate moratorium on all executions and promote an informed debate on the death penalty as first steps towards its abolition.”

Executions in Japan are shrouded in secrecy with prisoners typically given only a few hours’ notice, but some may be given no warning at all. Their families are usually notified about the execution only after it has taken place.

In April 2020, Kyoto will host the 14th United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, a forum that brings together criminal justice experts among governments, intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations, and scholars to share experiences and identify solutions to problems relating to crime prevention and criminal justice. Several panels will seek to address the use of the death penalty in Japan and globally.

Amnesty opposes the death penalty in all cases without exception regardless of the nature of the crime, the characteristics of the offender or the method used by the state to carry out the execution, and has been campaigning for abolition of the death penalty for more than 40 years. – Amnesty, 2/8/2019